Art & History

The Last Paintings Of Famous Artists (8 Artist) (Part 2)

Ever wondered what the last artworks of some of history’s greatest artists looked like? Well if so then you’re in luck because we’ve collected thirty seven final masterpieces from some of the world’s most well-known artists. Here is a second part of this series, we will cover more artist in the upcoming posts!

11 Rembrandt: Simeon With The Christ Child In The Temple, Unfinished (1669)

This painting by Rembrandt van  Rijn (1606-1669) was found uncompleted in his studio prior to his sudden death aged 63. It now hangs in the National Museum in Stockholm, Sweden. The painting depicts an old man holding an infant, a subject he had painted twice before. The work illustrates a passage from the Gospel of St. Luke, in which Mary and Joseph take Jesus to the temple in Jerusalem. The figure in the background was probably painted afterwards by somebody else.

#12 Georgia O’Keeffe: The Beyond, Last Unassisted Oil Painting (1972)

Georgia Totto O’Keeffe was an American artist. She was known for her paintings of New York skyscrapers, enlarged flowers, and New Mexico landscapes. O’Keeffe is often regarded as the “Mother of American modernism.” Her eyesight was compromised by macular degeneration in 1972, and this left her with only peripheral vision. This naturally affected her work and she stopped oiling painting without assistance in 1972, although she continued with help thereafter. Her last unassisted oil painting is called The Beyond (1972).

#14 Henri Matisse: La Gerbe, One Of His Last Works (1953)

French artist Henri Matisse (1869-1954) was a revolutionary and influential painter of the early 20th century, best known for the expressive color and form of his Fauvist style. His last work was Le Gerbe (1953), a piece made from ceramic tile embedded in plaster. It was his only west coast commission and it can be found in the Los Angeles County Museum of Art (LACMA).

#16 Rene Magritte: The Empire Of Lights, Unfinished (1967)

Pieter Bruegel the Elder (1525-1569) was a Netherlandish Renaissance painter and printmaker known for his peasant scenes and landscapes. His last work was Storm at Sea, an unfinished oil-on-panel painting depicting ships in the midst of choppy waters. It can be found in the Kunsthistorisches Museum in Vienna.

#18 Paul Cézanne: The Gardener Vallier (1906)

Paul Cézanne (1839-1906) was a French artist and Post-Impressionist painter. Between 1902 and 1906, Cézanne painted a number of portraits of Vallier, the gardener at his Les Lauves studio. The one he painted in 1906, which is comparable with the late portraits of Rembrandt, both in its seriousness of mood and in its bold, broad execution, is thought to be his last work.

#19 Caravaggio: Martyrdom Of Saint Ursula (1610)

Michelangelo Merisi (Michael Angelo Merigi or Amerighi) da Caravaggio (1571 – 1610) was an Italian painter. His work is characterised by a dramatic use of lighting, and he is thought to have had a formative influence on Baroque painting. His last work is thought to be The Martyrdom of Saint Ursula. It is now a part of the Intesa Sanpaolo Collection in the Gallery of Palazzo Zevallos Stigliano, Naples. Caravaggio died in 1610 while on his way to receive a pardon from the Pope for his part in the death of a young man in a duel four years earlier. The circumstances surround his death are unclear, but a fever is the most frequently cited cause.

#20 Paolo Uccello: Hunt In The Forest (1470)

Paolo Uccello (1397 – 10 December 1475), born Paolo di Dono, was an Italian painter and a mathematician who was known for his work on visual perspective in art. His best known works are the three paintings representing the battle of San Romano. His final painting was The Hunt in the Forest (1470). It demonstrates the use of perspective in Renaissance art, with the hunt participants disappearing into the dark forest in the distance. It is perhaps the best-known painting in the Ashmolean Museum in Oxford, England.

 

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